17 May

Olives in Provence

Discover where the Olive really come from, sorry it’s in French but the video speaks for itself…!

15 Jul

Greek island takes olive tree census

Scientists are trying to catalogue hundreds of olive trees, some more than 1,000 years old, on the Greek island of Crete in a bid to save them from abandonment amid falling olive prices, an agronomy institute said on Wednesday.

Olives have for centuries been a Cretan staple and a major source of income but falling prices threaten the trees’ as the crop is unprofitable.

Some of trees date back more than 1,000 years, as old as Greece’s famed archaeological treasures, scientists say. “We want to determine the age of these natural monuments and protect them,” Dimitris Lidakis, director of Crete’s School of Agronomy told AFP.

Hundreds of olive trees have already been cleared for construction, prompting the environmental initiative organised by some 30 associations and supported by the local technical institute.

Organiser Bella Lasithiotaki said there was one olive tree in the northern village of Vrysses in Rethymno prefecture that was more than 1,000 years old, with a trunk around 20 metres (66 feet) in circumference.

Another four trees of the same age have been located in the neighbouring prefecture of Iraklio, the semi-state Athens News Agency reported.

On a visit to Greece last year, Chinese President Hu Jintao visited a Crete archaeological cooperative where he helped workers picking olives.

[Source] Click here

14 Jul

Farmer looks to start olive oil industry in South Oregon

By Ron Brown,

With Southern Oregon establishing it’s reputation for growing grapes, another warm climate crop is starting to take root.

olive-field-south-oregon

More than 130 acres between Jacksonville and Medford are the beginning of what some hope will be an olive oil industry in the Rogue Valley.

Olive tree Grower Jeff Hoyal has planted more than 86,000 Greek and Spanish olive varieties he believes are well-suited to this area’s weather and soil.

“We have Koriniki, which is a Greek variety, a very peppery oil. We have Arbisona, which is a Spanish variety and is a very sweet oil. And then we have Arbiqina, which is another Spanish variety, which is a very buttery oil. And all three of them are, historically, create the top quality extra virgin oil that, that you’re really looking for,” Olive Tree Grower Jeff Hoyal said.

The Oregon State University extension service in Southern Oregon is also experimenting with 60 trees in a test plot.

[Source] Click here + watch the video

13 Jul

Olive water study in Australia

A rural Industries Research Development Corporation study has shown that olive growers can reduce their irrigation without sacrificing yield.

The study also suggests the characteristics of the olives are not affected by reducing water volumes.

The study, Olive Crop Management for Optimal Sensory and Chemical Quality Project, was carried out over four years at a large property near Yarrawonga in Victoria.

The project’s chief investigator, NSW DPI scientist Dr Rodney Mailer, said the outcomes indicated that growers were applying more water than they needed to achieve a satisfactory crop.

[Source] Click here

03 Jul

Californian Olive Oil Labels reflect new data

As California’s olive oil industry expands and refines, designations of various grades of oil are becoming more distinct and more identifiable.

Consumers will face challenges as they learn to differentiate between extra virgin (high-quality) and oil pressed from the pomace of cull olives. All of the oil is expected to move through one market level or another.

Help is on the way. A new California law specifies and adopts international olive oil grades. How that will affect marketing and movement of the growing supply of oil is discussed in a report by two agricultural and resource economists at the University of California, Davis.

Assistant Professor Travis Lybbert and Ph.D. candidate Christopher Gustafson wrote about the law and its effect in the January/February issue of Update, published by the university’s Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics.

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