12 Dec

Is simply eating whole olives as nutritious as consuming olive oil?

By Barbara Durbin,

The answer depends on what you mean by nutritious. Olives and olive oil both contain “good” (monounsaturated) fat, but fat is high in calories, so the more nutritious fat you consume, the more calories you consume also. A half-ounce of olives is considered to be a serving, at least by the federal government for nutritional labeling. The number of olives in a half-ounce depends on the variety, the size of the olives (sometimes indicated on the label) and whether they’re pitted or unpitted.

Likewise, 1 tablespoon of olive oil is considered to be a “serving.”

Want to compare a half-ounce of each of these two?

A serving (five olives) of medium-size California black pitted olives has 25 calories, and 21/2 grams total fat, mainly monunsaturated. In other words, very few calories and a small amount of good fat.

One serving of olive oil (one tablespoon) has 120 calories (five times that of the olives) and about 14 grams fat (so more than five times the fat of the olives), again mainly monounsaturated.

Between the two, for snacking, this olive nut would go for a few olives. But if I was already using an oil on a salad or in a recipe, I’d definitely reach for olive oil.

[Source] Click here

2 Responses to “Is simply eating whole olives as nutritious as consuming olive oil?”

  1. just a dude Says:

    I think you understood the question wrong. Let me rephrase and mostly repeat the question: ‘whole olives’ means the ‘meaty’ part and the ‘seed’ found in the middle.

    It doesn’t mean eating them like M&Ms either.

    Separately, surely. But in the end you end up eating a whole olive, see?

  2. Dude Again Says:

    I think you understood the question wrong. Let me rephrase and mostly repeat the question: ‘whole olives’ means the ‘meaty’ part and the ’seed’ found in the middle.

    It doesn’t mean eating them like M&Ms either.

    Separately, surely. But in the end you end up eating a whole olive, see?

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